Epiphone salutes Phil and Don

All of us at Epiphone are thinking of the late Phil Everly and his brother Don whose powerful rhythm guitar style was the inspiration for the rare Epiphone SQ-180 jumbo acoustic guitar. The Everly Brothers were partial to instruments from both Epiphone and Gibson throughout their career and you can hear that sound clearly on every record they made. It's a shame that the Americana Music Association didn't recognize them sooner for they are at the heart of the best Americana being made today.

Epiphone salutes Phil and Don The Everly's story is not only required reading and listening for rock and roll fans but for country fans, too. Ike Everly, the brothers' father, was an expert blues and country stylist and was an inspiration for both Merle Travis and Chet Atkins. And Ike's teacher? The one and only Arnold Schulz, the African American blues guitarist and fiddler who also taught Bill Monroe, the father of Bluegrass. After you make your way through the classic hits of the late 50's on Cadence like "Bye, Bye Love" and "Wake Up Little Susie," check out the Everly's unheralded cuts from the 60s like their original take on "Gone, Gone, Gone" (covered by Robert Plant and Alison Krauss), "Carol Jane," and "Bowling Green," covered by Neko Case on her debut. The documentary below is terrific and follows Phil and Don as they head back to Kentucky to meet old friends and family and retrace their steps in Nashville with Chet Atkins.

Have you got an Epipohone SQ-180? Send us your photos and learn some tips on Don's rhythm style below. Meanwhile, Epiphone's EJ-200, the "King of the Flattop," will give you the sound of the Everly classics cut at RCA Studio B in Nashville.

Epiphone salutes Phil and Don